Wednesday, November 4, 2009

The innocence and wonder of a new-born simply takes one's breath away. We hold our new babies and wish and pray for a life-time of health and happiness for these wee and fragile beings. Keep the pain and hurt away! Yet, we can't. The first ear-splitting hysterical cries of hunger remind us of the impact of this tiny life on our own. Soon there are cries of irritation, two-year old tantrums, pouts, and eventually maddening teen-age silence and unpredictable moods. Mixed in are larger than equal parts of joy and crazy-funny-silliness and almost more love than a parent's heart can hold. While life is never easy there are some children that just have more than their share of struggles and their families along with them. I have been privy to tales of sorrow for many years from my position as an educator. While sharing our own writing and experiences across the country, my daughter and I have heard heart-breaking stories of children and families struggling with mental health conditions as well as all other disabilities. There is no magic to ease the heart. Given that this blog is an "inside meandering" of my thoughts I guess that is what I am doing this early morning. No answers to all the pain we share with our children. But is there exceptional joy when you experience those times when things are finally or momentarily better? When a child is happy? Is there less living on auto-pilot when you known this pain and then you are granted times of grace? Just a thought.....
(photo by Jordan, beautiful grandson)

6 comments:

Corrie Howe said...

Thanks for sharing your thoughts. That's what is nice about blogging. I haven't read the article yet, but my husband did. He said he doesn't care what they call it or don't call it, as long as the services don't stop as a result of the change (or that insurance companies stop paying).

I'm going to read it and consider posting my thoughts on it for Friday's blog. Thanks for the heads up!

jdcoughlin said...

My sister had cerebral palsy and lived a shorter life, but was a blessing to all of us. One gift, through her three sisters, is that we make sure to look other people with mental health issues in the eye. We make sure not to discount them, in the just get over it way. Mental health, especially in teens, can be debilitating, silent, and deadly. Thanks for suggestive ways to keep eyes open.

Stephen Tremp said...

My kids are in elementary school now. We're already looking forward to grandchildren. But first, the teen years.

Stephen Tremp

Accidental Expert said...

Thanks for the thoughts. You know that our family is in major turmoil right now. What gets me through is the thought that someday, somehow it WILL get better. You and your daughter give me that hope. Thanks.

Alicia (aka Dr. Mom) said...

Yes, I think one of the things is that our lives probably DO become less on auto-pilot when dealing with special circumstances in our lives. And for all the challenges it poses, there are some amazing gifts too... if open to them and use them wisely and to spread 'good' -- which you and linea are DEFINATELY doing. You guys are my heros :)

Alicia (aka Dr. Mom) said...
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